KIM FIELDING on Modesto, Story Locations, and her new release ‘The Little Library’ (guest blog)

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The Little Library by Kim Fielding

Release Date:  March 27, 2018
Cover art: L.C. Chase

Buy links:

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Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words is happy to host Kim Fielding here today talking about her latest release The Little Library.  Welcome, Kim.

✒︎

 

Hi! I’m Kim Fielding and I’m very excited to announce the release of my newest novel, The Little Library! Set in California’s Central Valley, this story stars a guy with a slightly obsession with books. What’s not love about that, right?

I live in California. I’ve lived here for 25 years, but my husband is a native and my daughters are something like 5th generation Californians on his side. Thanks to movies and TV, people all over the world have at least some vague impressions about this state. Hollywood. Surfers. San Francisco. Redwoods. Death Valley. And all of those things really are here, of course. But California is a big state—its land mass is greater than that of Japan or Paraguay and only a little smaller than Sweden or Morocco—and there are parts of it that even most Californians aren’t familiar with.

I live in one of those parts: the San Joaquin Valley. In case you’re not a geography whiz, this is part of the Central Valley, lying flat and hot between the Sierra Nevadas and the coast ranges. About 4 million people live here, and there are a few larger cities (e.g., Fresno and Bakersfield), but most of the valley is rural. My new book, The Little Library, takes place here, in Modesto.

So what’s this area like? Well, we’re a couple of hours from beaches and redwoods. Celebrities are few and far between (although notable Modestans include Jeremy Renner, George Lucas, and James Marsters). Our winters tend to be cool and foggy, while our summers are oven-hot and bone-dry. People here tend to be more politically conservative than in the Bay Area. Housing prices are reasonable by California standards.

This is a heavy-duty agricultural area. We grow almost all of the country’s almonds and a whole lot of grapes (Gallo Winery is headquartered in Modesto). We have tomatoes, melons, feed corn, chickens, and dairy cattle. My subdivision, in a town about a half hour south of Modesto, sits on what used to be a bean field. Ours is a climate that allows backyards to sustain orange and apple trees, and rosemary and oregano become large shrubs.

This isn’t the most beautiful part of California, and it’s certainly not the most glamorous. People pass through here on the way to other places—Yosemite, Sacramento, LA—and few people would put the San Joaquin Valley at the top of their vacation wish lists. Still, I believe that almost every place on the planet has at least some charms, and interesting people live everywhere. Even in Modesto.

My decision to set The Little Library in Modesto was a deliberate one. Like their hometown, my protagonists—a failed academic and an ex-cop—aren’t flashy. Neither of them is wealthy, and they don’t look like they’ve stepped off a fashion runway. But they’re dealing with some universal issues. Fear of failure. Family conflicts. Uncertainty about their future. And, of course, the search for love.

Do you live somewhere nobody knows about? Or maybe you live somewhere famous but outsiders have misconceptions about your area. Please share in the comments!

***

About The Little Library

Elliott Thompson was once a historian with a promising academic future, but his involvement in a scandal meant a lost job, public shame, and a ruined love life. He took shelter in his rural California hometown, where he teaches online classes, hoards books, and despairs of his future.

Simon Odisho has lost a job as well—to a bullet that sidelined his career in law enforcement. While his shattered knee recovers, he rethinks his job prospects and searches for the courage to come out to his close-knit but conservative extended family.

In an attempt to manage his overflowing book collection, Elliott builds a miniature neighborhood library in his front yard. The project puts him in touch with his neighbors—for better and worse—and introduces him to handsome, charming Simon. While romance blooms quickly between them, Elliott’s not willing to live in the closet, and his best career prospects might take him far away. His books have plenty to tell him about history, but they give him no clues about a future with Simon.

***

About the Author

Kim Fielding is the bestselling author of numerous m/m romance novels, novellas, and short stories. Like Kim herself, her work is eclectic, spanning genres such as contemporary, fantasy, paranormal, and historical. Her stories are set in alternate worlds, in 15th century Bosnia, in modern-day Oregon. Her heroes are hipster architect werewolves, housekeepers, maimed giants, and conflicted graduate students. They’re usually flawed, they often encounter terrible obstacles, but they always find love.

After having migrated back and forth across the western two-thirds of the United States, Kim calls the boring part of California home. She lives there with her husband, her two daughters, and her day job as a university professor, but escapes as often as possible via car, train, plane, or boat. This may explain why her characters often seem to be in transit as well. She dreams of traveling and writing full-time.

Follow Kim:

Website: http://www.kfieldingwrites.com/

Facebook: http://facebook.com/KFieldingWrites

Twitter: @KFieldingWrites

Email: Kim@KFieldingWrites.com

Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bau3S9

A complete list of Kim’s books: http://www.kfieldingwrites.com/kim-fieldings-books/

 

A Highly Recommended Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words story.  Find our review here.

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