A MelanieM Review: Ted of the d’Urbervilles by Rob Rosen

Standard

Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5

Ted is an orphan, a young gay man living on the streets following the death of both his parents. Hope seems futile, though hope is exactly what he finds when a surprising email informs him that an unknown wealthy relative has died, that a reading of a will is soon to occur clear across the country. Ted will inherit something, but what that something is remains to be seen.

Benny is a young, homeless drug addict, straight except for when cash is involved. Benny has never had a reason to be hopeful about anything until a chance encounter with Ted.

Both men are soon traveling together from state to state, making ends meet however they can, rushing to the reading of the will that may or may not change both their lives forever. An unexpected friendship quickly forms, and then just as unexpectedly blossoms into something more as their adventure ultimately leads them to their fates.

At turns darkly funny and tragic, deeply erotic and poignant, Ted of the d’Urbervilles uniquely shines a light on the phrase “Love is Love” — though who they will find it with remains a mystery until the very end.

Rob Rosen has given me werewolves, unforgettable drag queens, drag queens zombies apocalypse, romance and intergalactic oddities, and now it’s his take on the classic Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Tom Hardy.  By that I mean a spin on family, society, class levels, and one’s place within it.  Here woen heavily with sex, pathos, intrigue, and an ending Tess herself wouldn’t have seen coming.

No indeed,Ted of the d’Urbervilles by Rob Rosen is a story that kept both my heart and interest focused on the characters and page from the moment I met Ted, homeless, starving, and desperately in need of a change of direction for his life.  Which he gets.The sheer pain of Ted’s past history and loss comes through, never more so in his first lucky tide when hitchhiking.  I will remember that trucker and her friend for many novels to come.  Awash in platitudes, warmth, and generosity, she is memorable and has a strength that will stay with the reader and Ted.

This book is full of interesting relationships and unusual dynamics, the one between Ted and Benny perhaps the most special.  The biggest element is that Ted and Benny come to love each other in a non typical  romance way but it actually manifests itself in sexual acts.  As though that is the only way both men know to show love, no matter what type of love it is.  Ted is gay, Benny is straight.  They love each other non romantically but have sex often.  Yes, it’s that complex a relationship and their future becomes equally involved when others are added to it.  Rosen has written these characters and their strange love and relationship in a way we get them.  And accept them as they are.    For the pain, the humor, and the angst they cause each other, but also the love and support.

Sometimes I feel Rob Rosen should come with a warning.  Read Rob Rosen at your own risk.  He’s not for the faint hearted.  He’s never boring.  He takes risks.  Sometimes they don’t pay off but most of the time they do.  And the emotional payload smacks you right in the heart.  As this one did just when I least expected it too.  Rosen likes to zig when other’s like to zag with their narrative flow and the waters can get stormy, but it’s worth every whitecap and high wave to get to shore.

When you get to the ending here, you will understand that sentence.  It’s the same feeling I get at the end of every Rob Rosen story.  A feeling of contentment, a journey will taken, a story well told.

Not familiar with this author?  Lucky for you there is a great library to discover but why not start here?  I definitely recommend Ted of the d’Urbervilles by Rob Rosen

Cover art definitely works for Ted and this story.

Buy Links

Amazon US  |  Amazon UK  |  JMS Books  |  GooglePlay

Book Details:

ebook, 195 pages
Published January 18th 2020 by JMS Bools
ISBN139781646562503
Edition LanguageEnglish

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