Down Under Showcase Day 14: Author A. B. Gayle

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Welcome, A. B. Gayle!

It’s Day 14 of STRW Down Under Author Showcase.  Today’s featured writer is A.B. Gayle from southern New Zealand.  Welcome, A.B.!    We have a wonderful interview with A.B. Gayle, complete with some pictures of her favorite places, discover this author through her books and bio!  Don’t forget to enter Gayle’s giveaway contest and search out the Down Under Scavenger Hunt word of the day!

 

Now on to our Facts of the Day for New Zealand and Australia!  It only seems right that we add in some mythology and legend in our New Zealand and Australian facts of the day:

New Zealand Fact of the Day:kiwi and NZ country

The Legend of New Zealand: Legend has it that New Zealand was fished from the sea by the daring demigod Maui. Now Maui was no ordinary man.  Maui is the gifted, clever demigod of Polynesian mythology responsible for fishing up the North Island of Aotearoa, New Zealand.waka-at-waitangi

After a miraculous birth and upbringing Maui won the affection of his supernatural parents, taught useful arts to mankind, snared the sun and tamed fire. But one of his most famous feats was fishing up the North Island.

Despising him, Maui’s four brothers conspired to leave him behind when they went out fishing. Overhearing their plans, Maui secretly made a fishhook from a magical ancestral jawbone. Then one night he crept into his brothers’ canoe and hid under the floorboards.

It wasn’t until the brothers were far out of sight of land and had filled the bottom of their canoe with fish that Maui revealed himself. Then he took out his magic fishhook and threw it over the side of the canoe, chanting powerful incantations as he did so.

The hook went deeper and deeper into the sea until Maui felt the hook had touched something. He tugged gently and far below the hook caught fast. It was a huge fish! Together with his brothers, Maui brought the fish to the surface.

Maui cautioned his brothers to wait until he had appeased Tangaroa the god of the sea before they cut into the fish. They grew tired of waiting and began to carve out pieces for themselves. These are now the many valleys, mountains, lakes and rocky coastlines of the North Island.

To this day the North Island is known to Maori as Te Ika a Maui or Maui’s fish. Take a look at a map of New Zealand to see the fish’s head in the south and its tail in the north. The South Island is also known as Te Waka a Maui or Maui’s canoe, and Stewart Island or Rakiura is known as Te Punga a Maui or Mau’s anchor stone.  For more information about New Zealand, visit here!

[Interesting side note:  This legend is extremely similar, for obvious reasons, to the legend of Hawaii and Samoa]

Australia Fact of the Day:AUS flag over country

Dreamtime. The Aborigines believe that the world began during a mythical period called Dreamtime, or The Dreaming. During this time, ancestral beings that slept beneath the ground emerged from the earth. They created the landscape, made people, established the laws by which people lived, and taught them how to survive. After the ancestral beings’ work was done, they returned underground.

The Aborigines actively recall the events of Dreamtime. By participating in certain rituals, individuals can reenact the journeys of their ancestors.

Read more about Australian aboriginal mythology here!

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Nourlangie Rock in the Northern Territory of Australia

 

By Scattered Thoughts

At over 50, I am ruled by my terriers, my gardens, and my projects. A knack for grubbing about in the woods, making mud pies, and tending to the injured worms, bugs, and occasional bird and turtle growing up eventually led me to working for the Parks. I was a park Naturalist for over 20 years, and observing Nature and her cycles still occupy my hours. From the arrival of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in the Spring to the first call of the Snow Geese heading south in the Fall, I am entranced by the seasons. For more about me see my bio on my blog.

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