Falling Back Into November and the Week Ahead in Reviews

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fall-back-clockOnce again, for most of us in the United States, its time to change the clocks,  As any kid (and adult could tell you), that twice a year, we go through the upsetting ritual of changing our clocks.  In autumn, we “fall back”.  And in Spring,, well, of course, we “spring forward).  Rhymes that help us remember which way to go on the clock face just in case this is too tough to remember.  Remember those clocks that were actually clocks and not timepieces?  That had hands that went ’round and ’round?  No?  Time to feel f)(&)king old again, I guess.

My circadian rhythm is all important and this stuff messes with it big time. While some may live by the Mayan calendar or the Chinese but if you live in the US and abide by the Gregorian Calendar, then you know that on Sunday, we all change our clocks.

Why you ask?

Well, its because of Daylight Savings Time.  Unless of course,, you live in Hawaii, Arizona, or in the  Navajo Nation.   Or even  overseas territories of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, and the United States Virgin Islands.  Then of course, you are exempt from this nonsense.

But for the rest of us, its time to screw up our sleeping habits, mess with our dogs schedules and in general, feel unsettled and out of sync. And while I never minded “falling back” as a kid because it meant sleeping in an hour longer, “springing forward” always sucked.  School came an hour early, plus in the winter it got darker earlier too!  *I know I know, but i was a kid*

Why, the nonsense you say?  Well, it’s history, man.  Going all the way back to 1918 and The Standard Time Act which brought daylight savings time into our lives.  Here’s a glimpse into our not so distant past:

Daylight saving time was primarily started in the United States for the sake of conserving energy. The Standard Time Act was passed in 1918, which officially established time zones and incorporated daylight saving months into federal law. This was during World War I, when national efforts were made to conserve materials for the war effort. It was believed that if daytime hours could correspond better with natural light, fewer tasks would need to be done at night. Homes would need to use less energy to stay lit.

After the war “Peace Time” was back in effect and the issue of daylight saving time was handled on a local level. This led to a great deal of confusion as different locations were constantly operating at different times. The Uniform Time Act was passed in 1966 to solve the problem. States were given the option to opt out of daylight saving time if they passed proper ordinances.Copyright AccuWeather.comDaylight-Saving-Time-Ends-Wallpaper-Card-of-Bear-Sleeping

After WWI, we got rid of it.  But WWII saw a return of conservation of energy and our resources and, voila, Daylight Savings Time returned. And now while it’s no longer a law, most states still go by DST including Maryland.   So today I will be just that little bit disgruntled, my timing out of whack and my dogs out of sync of their normal routines. And I will glare at that clock and say “at least it isn’t spring and I am springing forward”.

And here is the week ahead in reviews, so many great books from beginning to end:

Monday, Nov. 4       Lessons for a Suspicious Mind by Charlie Cochrane

Tuesday, Nov. 5:      Good Boy by Anne Tenino

Wed., Nov. 6:             Hat Trick by Chelle Dugan

Thurs., Nov. 7:           Illuminations by Rowan Speedwell

Friday, Nov. 8:           The Blight by Missouri Dalton

Saturday, Nov.9:       After The Fall by L.A. Witt

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