Authors of Color and Culture to Explore. This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

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Authors of Color and Culture to Explore

We have been talking about new things, new themes, new authors as we launch ourselves and our reading habits into Spring.  One of my favorite authors BA Tortuga offered up a list on her FB page of some of her favorite authors of color or diversity in other areas like culture. Others soon chimed in and the list grew and grew full of wonderful recommendations and authors that I wasn’t familiar with or books I hadn’t read.

Since this has been our topic this month and really last as well, I thought it was timely and wanted to share it with all of you.  Please feel free to add more.  Let’s keep this list growing!

LGBTQIA* and/or Romance Authors of color or/ of different cultures(no particular order)

AE Via,
Jade Lee,
La Quette,
Tigris Eden,
Chudney Defreitas-Thomas,
Bru Baker,
Piper J Drake,
T.j. Michaels,
Nikki Prince
Avril Ashton
Cole McCade

Pearl Love

AC Arthur
Angelicque Bautista
Jayce Ellis
Matthew Lang

Zhara Freytes

Nicole Forcine
Kevay Grey

Seressia Glass,
Shaila Patel,
Hildie McQueen,
 Daniel José Older
Riley Hart,
N K Jemisin
Rhys Ford,
 Rebekah Witherspoon,
Sherry Thomas,
Jeannine Li
Nina Crespo,
Stacy Reid,
Pintip Dunn,
Alisha Rai,
Xio Axelrod,
Robin Covington,
Caridad Pineiro,
Dahlia Rose,
Naima Simone
Theodora Taylor

Xio Axelrod
Falguni Kothari
Sienna Snow
Alexis Daria
Denny S. Bryce

Farrah Rochon.
Jacob Z. Flores
Angel Martinez

*I hadn’t realized how many of the authors rec’d were outside the LGBT spectrum.  Smh.  Double checking them now.

General Fiction Authors:

Toni Morrison, Malinda Lo, Isabel Allende, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Beverly Jenkins, Yolanda Wallace, CB Lee, Carla de Guzman, Lydia San Andres, Sonali Dev, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni. Chinelo Okparanta, Alice Walker, Carla Trujillo, Marino Tamaki, Terri de la Peña, Shani Mootoo, Krystal A. Smith,Brooklyn Wallace,Reese Ryan

What’s New In LGBT Romance Fiction Giveaway?

Give us your thoughts.  Maybe tell us ways in which you think it can be improved or that it has improved over the last few years.  What stories have made you think?  Stopped you with elements so current and relevant that it resonated with you?  Leave your comments with you email address.  Giveaway will continue until April 14th.  Must be 18 years of age or older to enter.

 

 

This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Sunday, April 8:

  • Kevin Klehr on Social Media Central
  • Authors of Color and Culture to Explore
  • This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Monday, April 9

  • DSP Promo Vicki Reese
  • Release Day Blitz for Ari McKay – Like The Night
  • DSP Promo Andrew Grey
  • RELEASE DAY BLITZ Syncopation by Anna Zabo
  • A Jeri Review: Once Burned (Anchor Point #6) by LA Witt
  • A MelanieM Review: Nobody’s Prince Charming (Road to Blissville #3) by Aimee Nicole Walker
  • A Lila Audiobook Review: Red Fish, Dead Fish ( Fish Out of Water #2) by Amy Lane and Greg Tremblay (Narrator)

Tuesday, April 10:

  • Cover Reveal for GR Lyons ‘ Ice On Fire
  • Cover Reveal –  On The Ice by Amy Aislin
  • Cover Reveal for  Creature by Kim Fielding (Other Worlds Ink)
  • Retro Review Tour –  Out Of Focus by L.A. Witt
  • A Jeri Review Retro Review Tour : Out Of Focus by L .A. Witt
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Review: Point of Contact by Melanie Hansen
  • A MelanieM Audiobook Review: Unlikely Hero by Sean Michael and Jeff Gelder (Narrator)

Wednesday, April 11:

  • BLITZ Big Man by Matthew J. Metzger
  • DSP Promo Xenia Melzer
  • Spotlight Tour  for Magic Runs Deep by Alex Whitehall
  • A MelanieM Review Hangover From Hell by Zakarrie Clarke
  • A Lucy Audiobook Review: The Secret of the Sheikh’s Betrothed by Felicitas Ivey and Simon Ferrar (Narrator)
  • An Alisa Audiobook Review: The Supers (The Supers #1) by Sean Michael and Kenneth Obi (Narrator)
  • A Jeri Review : Hug It Out (Haven Hart Universe #2) by Davidson King 

Thursday, April 12:

  • BLOG TOUR Hug It Out by Davidson King
  • BLOG TOUR Let Me In by Luna David
  • Spotlight Tour for Once Burned by LA Witt (Anchor Point #6)
  • A Free Dreamer Review: Dusk (Expedition 63 #1) by T.A. Creech
  • An Alisa Review: Oliris by S. Neff
  • A Lila Audiobook Review: The Gryphon King’s Consort by Jenn Burke and Andrew McFerrin (Narrator)
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Review:  Squared Away (Out of Uniform #5) by Annabeth Albert

Friday, April 13:

  • DSP Dreamspun Promo Kim Fielding on A Full Plate
  • Review Tour – Garrett Leigh’s  Soul To Keep (RH #2)
  • Review Tour – Captain Merric by Rebecca Cohen
  • A MelanieM Review : Captain Merric by Rebecca Cohen
  • A MelanieM Review: Soul to Keep (Rented Heart universe) by Garrett Leigh
  • An Alisa Review: Timtuk Canyon Ranch (Mojave Mountain Wolves, #1) by A.J. Llewellyn
  • A Lucy Review: Eyes Wide Open by VM Sanford

Saturday, April 14:

  • RELEASE BLITZ – Rising Tide by Bryce Winters
  • Release Blitz – Kris T Bethke – Beholden
  • A MelanieM Review: Lessons in Chasing the Wild Goose by Charlie Cochrane

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Release Blitz for On a Summer Night by Gabriel D. Vidrine (excerpt and giveaway)

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Title:  On a Summer Night

Author: Gabriel D. Vidrine

Publisher:  NineStar Press

Release Date: April 2, 2018

Heat Level: 1 – No Sex

Pairing: Male/Male

Length: 56200

Genre: Contemporary, LGBT, contemporary, YA, trans, bisexual, asexual, coming-of-age, coming out, family drama, HFN, #ownvoices

Add to Goodreads

Synopsis

Fourteen-year-old Casey is determined to have fun this summer going to camp with his best friend, Ella. His overprotective mother frets that attending this one instead of trans camp like he’s always done will cause problems, but Casey has his heart set on going stealth anyway.

His mom just might be right.

All Ella wants is love for her best friend, and she’s determined to set him up with someone, despite Casey’s protests that he just wants to have fun, not get involved in a summer romance. But things get complicated when camp bully Ryan focuses his energies on the two friends. At least Casey’s cute bunkmate, Gavin, appears interested in getting to know him better, making Casey rethink the whole romance thing.

Until he finds out Gavin and Ryan are good friends.

Summer camp turns into so much more when Casey has to decide if Gavin is worth pursuing, friend of a bully or not.

There’s just one more problem: Ryan knows Casey is transgender.

Excerpt

On a Summer Night
Gabriel D. Vidrine © 2018
All Rights Reserved

“Do you have your socks?” my mother called up the stairs.

“Yes, mother!” I shouted back down at her. Of course I had socks. But I double-checked the large footlocker anyway, scrabbling through it until I found them. They were buried under my binders, but there they were.

“Don’t forget towels!” came another shout up the stairs.

She knew me well. I always forgot something. I went back to my bathroom and rummaged around in the linen closet until I found enough towels for the trip.

When I got back to my room, Mom was staring down into my trunk, her hands on her hips. “Anything else?” she asked, eyeing how much was in it.

“I hope not.”

I tossed the towels in the trunk, only to be crushed into a hug from her. “I’m going to miss you Casey,” she said into my hair.

I patted her awkwardly. She meant well, but ever since I announced my desire to transition two years ago when I turned twelve, she’d gotten super overprotective and clingy. “I’ll miss you too, Mom.” I did mean it, but it was going to be a relief to be away from her for almost two weeks. Even though I’d never been away from my parents that long before, not even at trans camp.

She squeezed me harder until I gasped and then let me go. “Are you sure you want to do this?”

“For the millionth time, yes,” I said, rolling my eyes.

“Okay. I’ll get your dad to get this down the stairs,” she said, and then she was gone in a whirl of brown hair and scarves.

I shook my head at her back and pulled out my phone to text my best friend, Ella.

Me: Almost ready. U?

I knew she wouldn’t answer right away (she actually hated her phone, the weirdo), so I nervously went through my list again to make sure I hadn’t forgotten anything. I needed a distraction.

While I was rummaging, my dad, a big guy who had prematurely gone bald so he always wore an ugly hat, had lumbered up the stairs and was frowning down at my trunk. “Are you sure you need all that?” His voice was very deep.

“Yeah, Dad.” My phone buzzed in my pocket, but I ignored it. “It’s almost two weeks.”

“Twelve days,” he said.

“Yeah, I know.” I scratched at my head, slightly embarrassed to talk about my transition stuff with my dad. “I, you know, need some extra stuff.” I thought of the binders lying next to my socks.

He glanced at me and nodded, and then looked quickly away. He hadn’t been as supportive of my transition as my mom. When I first told him, he blurted, “But you’re a girl.”

We stood there in awkward silence for a moment as I wondered what I should say to him, father to son. But he hadn’t yet called me his son.

He cleared his throat, still not looking at me, and then crouched and heaved up the trunk onto a roller cart he’d carried up the stairs. It was going to be a pain getting it down on the cart, but at least he wouldn’t kill his back picking it up this way.

I helped him maneuver it down the stairs, wishing not for the first time I could start hormones. I wanted to be as strong as my dad, but I wasn’t old enough yet. Well, I was, but my parents wouldn’t approve it until I was sixteen. I figured Dad was the one holding out, because Mom would give me whatever I wanted.

Two more years.

When we finally got the trunk down the stairs, I pulled my phone out. Ella had texted back.

Ella: Yeah, loading the car. Are you ready?

Me: Yes! Just gotta say bye.

Ella: We’ll be there soon.

“Ella and her parents are going to be here soon,” I told my parents.

Mom had argued long and hard about how I was getting to camp. She wanted to take me, but I wanted to go with Ella and her parents. My friend and her brother had been going to this camp for years, and her parents knew exactly how to get there. Mom pursed her lips and crossed her arms over her chest. “Okay. Are you sure you have it all?”

Annoyance flared up. “Yes!” I said.

“Don’t take that tone with your mother,” Dad warned.

I closed my mouth and let the anger subside. It wouldn’t do to get into an argument with them now. They’d probably not let me go, whether or not they had already paid for my spot. And summer camp wasn’t cheap; I’d seen prices on the website.

“Sorry,” I mumbled, and Mom pulled me into another hug.

“Be safe, okay?” she said. “I wish you wanted to go to the trans camp instead.”

“Mom, please!”

“Okay, okay, I know. You want to go to regular camp like any regular boy.”

“I went to trans camp last year,” I said.

“I know, and you loved it. That’s why I wish you’d go again.”

“Stop worrying so much, Mom,” I told her. “The kids won’t hurt me.”

She didn’t look convinced when she finally let me go. It was true; trans camp had been fantastic. But everyone there knew I was trans. I wanted to go someplace where I didn’t always feel trans. I knew it was impossible, but I wanted a shot at it. All the other kids at trans camp had loved it, because they’d said they could shed their trans identity there. Since everyone was trans, we got to talk about other things. It made it less special, which was, in reality, a relief.

And that was the problem for me. I just wanted to be like any other boy. And all the other boys went to summer camp like the one I was going to, not to trans camp. I wanted to be a boy with the other boys.

Purchase

NineStar Press | Amazon | Smashwords | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

Meet the Author

Gabriel D. Vidrine is a trans masculine scientist, dancer, and writer but is working towards reversing that order. They teach and perform belly dance all over the country, but still manage to cram in writing time whenever and wherever possible.

They are an avid reader and writer, and love science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal romance, but will give any genre a try.

Gabriel lives with their husband, video game systems, and ridiculous cat, Selina, in Chicago, IL.

Website | Facebook | Twitter

Giveaway

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Julie Aitcheson on Covers and her new release First Girl (author guest post)

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First Girl by Julie Aitcheson
Harmony Ink Press
Cover Art:  Aaron Anderson

Buy Links

Amazon |  Barnes & Noble |   Dreamspinner Press

Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words is happy to have Julie Aitcheson here today talking about her latest novel First Girl. Welcome, Julie.

♦︎

“Cover Story”

By Julie Aitcheson, Author: First Girl, Harmony Ink Press, April 2018

I love talking about the cover for my book, because it is exactly how I pictured it. With minimal back and forth and few specifics from me, artist Aaron Anderson (contracted by Dreamspinner Press), hit it out of the park. The image is dark and haunting- a frail female form borne up through murky water in a shaft of iridescent light. It encapsulates the essence of the book in the way every writer surely hopes their cover will.

Water is as much a central character of First Girl as my heroine, Gabi Lowell. Water’s scarcity shapes everything about Gabi’s existence, from her environment to what she eats and drinks to the politics that govern her world. The fear of the distant, unseen ocean permeates the psyche of her community, and her unfathomable connection with it (and the creatures therein) is what ultimately lures her out of her frightened complacency and into the unlikely role of hero. In this passage from the first part of the book, we witness Gabi in her room, her sanctuary, and get a first glimpse of this defining relationship with water:

“Go put on something dry while I put out your pills with some tea and cake. It’s already thirty minutes past time.” Gram’s hair stood out in white shocks from her head, adding drama to the urgency in her voice. When it came to the pills, every minute mattered. Taken as a powder mixed into formula when Gabi was a baby, then swallowed whole with water when she was old enough to manage pills, the medicine was a fact of Gabi’s life. The pills, her father explained, were the only things keeping Gabi’s lungs working. Missing a dose or taking one too late could cause her entire respiratory system to shut down, like sealing a whale’s blowhole shut and holding it deep underwater.

Gabi took her first relaxed inhale since leaving the house that morning and released it on a sigh as she entered her room and shut the door behind her. The walls were painted in blended shades of blue and green, an impressionistic rendering of seaweed-swirled water. Her books, hundreds of them, were crammed into bookcases and milk crates and stacked into wobbly towers that deterred anyone but Gabi from entering for fear of triggering an avalanche. She was not a hoarder, Gabi insisted when her father and brother ribbed her for her trove of books. She was simply starved for information. Sometimes she thought she would rather have words than air.

As she peeled off her dripping socks and leggings, Gabi’s gaze wandered to the carefully marked books on cetacean biology piled within easy reach of her bed. She had been eating, sleeping, and breathing whales in preparation for her presentation that day, certain that if she just knew her subject matter well enough, the words would flow effortlessly out of her. She was wrong.

Whales were a peculiar fascination for a girl who was afraid of water. The mere thought of being close to more than a bucketful of the stuff was enough to make Gabi shake, a phobia her father didn’t discourage. Recreational swimming had been forbidden since before Gabi was born anyhow. Water resources were scarce and every available drop that fell or condensed was immediately sequestered for purification and municipal use. Anyone who violated these practices risked heavy fines and even imprisonment. Immersion in water was illegal. All bathing was done from a small ration delivered in measured containers three times weekly around Alder, just as it was in every other branch of the Unitas fellowship. Precipitation in the form of rain or snow was collected and transported to a treatment facility wherever possible.

There was no real need to deter residents from collecting their own water stores. Thanks to years of unchecked emissions and nuclear meltdowns during The Great Strain, which attacked technologies as well as life forms, no one dared use or ingest water before trained professionals treated it. Though she gobbled up any small morsel of information she could about the mysteries of marine biology, Gabi couldn’t imagine actually seeing the ocean, watching it swell and threaten to consume her. But something drew her back to her books time and again and compelled her to recreate her own dry land version of the sea in her tiny bedroom.”

I wish I had a clear, writerly explanation for how Water showed up as a principal character in my book, but I don’t. I’m just grateful for a cover that shows Gabi in her true element and rising up, as all good heroes must.

First Girl by Julie Aitcheson

Blurb

Some things are worth fighting for: a sense of identity, personal freedom, truth, and new love—even in a society that forbids them.

In the aftershocks of catastrophic climate change, the fundamentalist Christian group Unitas seized the opportunity to grab power in the United States. Gabi’s father, Sam Lowell, is one of the most powerful men on the Unitas council… and his sickly daughter’s hero, until Gabi discovers the horrors being carried out in the name of religion.

Gabi’s mission to expose Unitas will take her into the company of misfits and dissidents and beyond the borders of everything she knows as her life is threatened at every turn. Along the way, she uncovers her true origins and astonishing power, along with a ruthless dictatorship masquerading as a benevolent democracy that will stop at nothing—including playing God—to win the game of survival.

About the Author

Julie Aitcheson began her pursuit of writing as a screenwriter, then realized that a little exposition never hurt anyone and switched to books. She has had articles published in Echo QuarterlyCommunities Magazine (formerly Talking Leaves Magazine), Isabella, and All Things Girl.  Most recently, she received a full fellowship to the 2013 Stowe StoryLabs and won second place in the 2014 San Miguel Writers’ Conference nonfiction writing competition.

Julie lives wherever her bohemian heart takes her, and wherever she can hit the hiking trails when her muse decides to take a personal day. She has worked extensively with young adults as an experiential educator, both across the United States and in India. After spearheading an initiative to assist at-risk youth in becoming trained for green jobs, Julie threw herself into writing stories for young adults that do justice to their intelligence and complex emotional lives. Her debut novel, Being Roy, was released by Harmony Ink Press in October of 2017.

Julie continues to seek out unique life experiences to provide grist for the mill of her imagination, including her work as a medical actress at a simulation laboratory. There, she indulged her love of the dramatic arts and her passion for health education while amassing enough writing material to sink a barge.

Social Media

Author Website: www.julieaitcheson.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/julie.aitcheson.7

Twitter: https://twitter.com/julsaitch

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julsaitch/

Google+:  https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JulieAitcheson

Fresh Starts and Into April We Go. This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

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Fresh Starts and into April We Go

Here it is April 1st and I’m full of plans and hopeful for fresh starts as I sip on my coffee as gaze out into the disaster that’s my backyard.  That’s right you heard me, a mess of a backyard. So why so hopeful?  Because now instead of dwelling on that huge old white pine that crashed during that last Nor’easter, taking down fences, crushing gardens and things, I’m looking at planning new ones, planting new storm resistant trees, and having a ball.  I’ve got a clean slate to start over.  Do things differently, better hopefully.  Maybe try new plants that are more in accordance with my changing climate and planting schedule.  Who knows?  It will be fun figuring things out and seeing what my blank slate brings….

Same with reading.  Of my last ten books, most of the the authors have been new to me.  I have liked that.  Not all have sowed roots in my library garden of books.  Some I will gladly return to because I thoroughly enjoyed their stories, others showed promise even though I thought their books more outline than finished product.  I like finding authors with a fresh approach to writing and stories.  I like finding new authors period.  Several of them I will be reviewing this week.  So many of our reviewers are wonderful about bringing new authors to my attention.  I love it when that happens.  There can never be too many books or too many new authors to my mind.

That’s why I’m so happy to announce we are adding a new reviewer here at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words.  Please be on the look out for review from Lucy. Here’s an introduction:

Lucy

HI! My name is Lucy and I’ve been an avid reader since I was a kid.  I was the one taking a book everywhere and then missing what I was supposed to be doing.  Still that way, I think.  My iPad is always in my purse and my commute to work as a teacher resource specialist is filled with audiobooks.  I read a variety of works but MM remains my favorite.  I am a big fan of super sweet and gooey and I love novellas and short stories.   I am sort of wimpy when it comes to heavy angst  – reading is my escape.  I live in the Midwest, where we have two seasons – hockey and baseball!

Welcome, Lucy!

**************

And with everything that went on during the last few months that opened up much needed dialog about racism, books featuring POC and change within the publishing community, I would like to think we are moving forward here as well.  A fresh outlook, a fresh perspective on publishing, covers, and even widening our own outlook on books we read, myself included.

 

Several of our readers chimed in with suggestions which I’m including here. I have linked all the story suggestions for you. Plenty of time to get your own suggestions in:

From Steve Wroten:

Thanks, so true about how spring has sprung.
Nice way to bring in spring. Sorry for this long comment, and I don’t know if this is what you had in mind for “What’s New,” but it spurred these thots:
After the previous two weeks of high winds, I took a week off and didn’t respond to last week’s post yet, but wanted to. And this week’s topic is a nice segue. I had previously given my thots in your Mar 11 post; and just wanted to say I appreciate your keeping that, while some other bloggers deleted my similar posts. I think it’s improving that we can talk about these issues. As another example, I think I see increased representation of people of color, and I thought I’d suggest some recent books I found to be good stories:
A Love Like Blood, by Victor Yates (powerful YA that won Lambda debut novel)
Nobody’s Son, by Shae Connor (two strong black leading men)
Asylum, by Robert Winter (just finished ARC, about illegal immigrant from El Salvador finding love)
Cut Hand series, by Mark Wildyr (nice Native American perspective)
Southernmost Murder, by C.S. Poe (I’m becoming a fan of Poe – Asian FBI agent helps soon-to-be boyfriend with a cozy mystery)

From jen:

I think there are more books with diverse characters – sexuality, ethnicity, culture etc. And I hope that trend continues, both because these types of stories are needed and because I like them. 🙂 Some of my recs from recent reads are:
Wildflowers by Suki Fleet (the love interest is mute & middle-eastern)
The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue (audiobook) by Mackenzi Lee (historical adventure/love story with a theme about race, class & a person’s “worth”; plus awesome narration)
Throwing Stones (Glasgow Lads on Ice #1) by Avery Cockburn (One of the MCs is demi-sexual, the other one has ADHD and there is curling)
The Long Past & Other Stories by Ginn Hale (Cool steampunk AU with an ex-slave MC & the love interest is an amputee plus there is magic)
I second the rec for Southernmost Murder by C.S. Poe.

Soooooo……

What new things have you all noticed, if anything?  New issues that the authors have incorporated?  New ways in which they’ve kept it real (if contemporary) and fresh (no matter the genre).  So this is the start of ….

What’s New In LGBT Romance Fiction Giveaway?

Give us your thoughts.  Maybe tell us ways in which you think it can be improved or that it has improved over the last few years.  What stories have made you think?  Stopped you with elements so current and relevant that it resonated with you?  Leave your comments with you email address.  Giveaway will continue until April 14th.  Must be 18 years of age or older to enter.

 

Meanwhile, happy April, happy Eostre or Easter, whatever you may celebrate.  Spring is here and with it new beginnings.  Let’s celebrate that. I’m a true gardener and forever hopeful and yet pragmatic.  Garden catalogs and new stories await me.  What’s waiting for you?  Have a wonderful week.  Here’s what’s ahead for you here at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words.

This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

 

Sunday, April 1:

  • A Free Read Alert from Jay Northcote ~ International Transgender Day of Visibility and Starting from Scratch
  • Fresh Starts and Into April We Go. This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Monday, April 2:

  • Harmony Promo Julie Aitcheson on First Girl
  • BLITZ Bank Run by Alli Reshi
  • Release Blitz – Garrett Leigh – Soul To Keep (RH #2)
  • A Caryn Review: The Moth and Moon by Glenn Quigley
  • A Lila Review: Promise Me We’ll Be Okay by Nell Iris
  • A MelanieM PreRelease Review: Magic Runs Deep by Alex Whitehall

Tuesday, April 3:

  • BLITZ On a Summer Night by Gabriel D. Vidrine
  • BLOG TOUR Nobody’s Prince Charming by Aimee Nicole Walker
  • Eyes Wide Open by V.M. Sanford Blog Tour
  • A MelanieM Release Day Review: No Tears for Darcy by Vicki Reese
  • An Alisa Release Day Review: Kiss Me Forever by M.J. O’Shea
  • A MelanieM Release Day Review:  Sweet Nothings (Amuse Bouche #1) by T. Neilson

Wednesday, April 4:

  • Release Blitz: Midnight Twist by Rian Durant
  • TOUR Tested in Fire (Art Medium #2) by EJ Russell
  • A Caryn Review: Tested in Fire (Art Medium #2) by EJ Russell
  • A MelanieM Release Day Review: Vice Enforcer (Vice City #2) by S.A. Stovall
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Review:  The Ballerino and the Biker (The Hedonist #1) by Rebecca James

Thursday, April 5:

  • BLOG TOUR Syncopation by Anna Zabo
  • DSP Dreamspun Promo T. Neilson on Sweet Nothings
  • RELEASE BLITZ for Omega Shadow (Book 3 of the Pine Creek Lake Den series) by Quinn Michaels
  • A Stella Review :Wheels and Heels (Stories from the Hen and Hog #1) by Jaime Samms
  • An Alisa Review: Kept in the Dark by H.L Day
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Audiobook Review: Heart Unheard (Hearts Entwined #2) by Andrew Grey and Greg Tremblay ((Narrator)

Friday, April 6:

  • DSP Publications Promo S.A. Stovall on Vice Enforcer
  • Inked in Vegas by K.M. Neuhold Release Blitz and Giveaway
  • Release Blitz and Giveaway for Captain Merric by Rebecca Cohen
  • A Jeri Release Day Review: Roses in the Devil’s Garden (Fallen Rose #1) by Charlie Cochet
  • A Stella Review: The Little Library by Kim Fielding
  • A Lila Release Day Review: Roses in the Devil’s Garden (Fallen Rose #1) by Charlie Cochet

Saturday, April 7:

  • Austin by Felice Stevens Release Day Blitz
  • Campus Life by TC Orton Blog Tour
  • A MelanieM Review: Murder Takes the High Road by Josh Lanyon

 

 

 

 

 

March Winds Blowing In a Fresh Start. This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words.

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March Winds Blowing In a Fresh Start

We end this tumultuous month as we started it…with the high winds blowing bringing with it all sorts of changes.  To my mind, and with Spring in mind, I’m hoping these will be positive ones, showing new growth and a new start for tomorrow.  Isn’t that what Spring is all about?

True, some of the new starts can get a little shaky.  Those March winds are fierce.  First tries don’t always end up like we want.  Small seedlings droop in unexpected snows, and kites get caught up in trees.   But then the sun comes up, the temperatures rise, and yes the winds  finally die down….and boom, back on track again.  The ability to absorb and move forward, the strength to be resilient…well, we see it time and again.

So this week let’s finish out March and get a brand new start in April!  Let’s look at romance, new loves, maybe even renewed love no matter the age.  Spring is a time for growth in our romance novels.  What new things have you all noticed, if anything?  New issues that the authors have incorporated?  New ways in which they’ve kept it real (if contemporary) and fresh (no matter the genre).  So this is the start of ….

What’s New In LGBT Romance Fiction Giveaway?

Give us your thoughts.  Maybe tell us ways in which you think it can be improved or that it has improved over the last few years.  What stories have made you think?  Stopped you with elements so current and relevant that it resonated with you?  Leave your comments with you email address.  Giveaway will continue until April 14th.  Must be 18 years of age or older to enter.

Now for this week’s reviews and tours!  Let our week take flight!

This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Sunday, March 25:

  • March Winds Blowing In a Fresh Start.
  • This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words.

Monday, March 26:

  • Retro Review Tour – Ann Gallagher’s  The Left Hand Of Calvus
  • DSP Dreamspun Promo Parker Foye
  • Review Tour – Lynn Michaels – Out Of The Ocean
  • A MelanieM Review : The Left Hand of Calvus (Warriors of Rome #1) by Ann Gallagher
  • A VVivacious Review: You’re My Everything by Lily G Blunt
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Audiobook Review:  Bone to Pick by T.A. Moore and Michael Fell (Narrator)

Tuesday, March 27:

  • Blog Tour – The Rescuer by Eric Huffbind
  • Book Blast – Love Worth Fighting For by Dara Nelson
  • EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT TOUR Moon Illusion by Michelle Osgood
  • In Our Spotlight:KIM FIELDING on The Little Library
  • A MelanieM Review: Flamecaller by Caitlin Ricci
  • A Caryn Release Day Review: The Architect and the Castle of Glass by Jade Mere
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Review: The Little Library by Kim Fielding

Wednesday, March 28:

  • Blog Tour Bones of Belief by Jess Thomas
  • RELEASE DAY BLITZ INVITATION TO THE BLUES (Small Change #2) by Roan Parrish
  • A Stella Review : One Under by JL Merrow
  •  VVivacious Review: You’re My Everything by Lily G Blunt
  • A MelanieM Audio Review : I Heart Boston Terriers by Rick R. Reed and Tom Askin (Narrator)
  • A MelanieM Review: Squared Away by Annabeth Albert

Thursday, March 29:

  • Release Day Blitz Hug It Out by Davidson King
  • Leaning Into the Look by Lane Hayes Blog Tour
  • Release Day Blitz: Hug It Out by Davidson King
  • A Lila Review: Bad Seed by Gareth Vaughn
  • A Stella Review: The Little Library by Kim Fielding
  • A MelanieM Review The Rescuer by Eric Huffbind

Friday, March 30:

  • Release Blitz Riza Curtis – Rended Hearts
  • PROMO Men of London series by Susan MacNicol
  • Release Blitz – You’re My Everything by Lily G. Blunt
  • A Caryn Release Day Review: Summer Ride by Susan Laine
  • A MelanieM Review:Dragon Magic by Megan Derr
  • An Alisa Review Promises Part 4 by A.E. Via

Saturday, March 31:

  • An Alisa Review Promises Part 4 by A.E. Via
  • A MelanieM Review: Murder Takes the High Road by Josh Lanyon

 

A Caryn Review: The Weekend Bucket List by Mia Kerick

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Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

This is one of the best YA books I’ve ever read.  It is emphatically not a romance, and to be honest, that’s what makes it so wonderful.

If you were asking for advice, Coop, I’d tell you that friendship is the deepest form of love.  But society deems the love between friends less important than romantic love.  Friendship is highly underrated.

That quote is from Cooper’s father, and I think sums up the theme of the book pretty completely.

Cooper is the high school valedictorian, a nerdy kid who’s never really been tempted to act out, and who has been good as gold for his entire high school career.  His best friend is Cady, another outcast nerd who “has always been game for any kind of fun that’s rated G.”  The two have been best friends who became especially close when Cady’s twin brother overdosed and went to rehab.  They’ve supported each other through high school, and now that they’re near graduation, Cady came up with a plan to do all the things they missed by being “good” kids – the Weekend Bucket List.  They are both frightened of leaving each other when they go to different schools, and both are wondering if what they feel for each other is more than just an extremely close friendship.

While carrying out their plan, they meet Eli, a lonely young man who dropped out of high school and has been working with carnivals and moving from town to town.  Cooper and Cady spontaneously adopt him into their plans, and they have an intense weekend that answers some questions, but raises even more difficult ones.  When the weekend is over, everything falls apart.

Fortunately, they have the summer to repair things before they go their separate ways.

I love how all the emotions are in this book – love, anger, jealousy, betrayal, hope, fear, and faith.  All three of these characters are at times unintentionally cruel to each other, and each at different times gives up on the other two.  Eli especially just broke my heart, because he had so little to begin with, and was so open and trusting, “falling into friendship” too quickly because he was so starved for affection.  In the end, all three of them learned strength and faith as they came together and fell apart over the summer, and learned how to be kind and honest and to truly appreciate the depth of their friendship.

Learning to differentiate between platonic love and romantic love can be very difficult, especially when there is some physical attraction, and definitely at that age!  What this book did so beautifully was elevate platonic love to the level it deserves, validate it in a world that talks way too much about finding “the one”, and legitimize the idea that soul mates don’t have to be lovers.  It was a beautiful book, and one that I am going to recommend to a lot of people.

Cover art by CB Messer is simple, eye-catching, and perfect for a YA book.

Sales Links:  Interlude Press | Amazon

Book Details:

Kindle Edition
Expected publication: April 19th 2018 by Duet Books
ASINB0797P1NX1
Edition LanguageEnglish

A MelanieM Review: Mage of Inconvenience by Parker Foye

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Rating: 4 stars out of 5

Can they find the magic in a practical union?

West is on the run from his werewolf pack, but if he cannot renew his magical defenses, he won’t get far. What he needs is a mage….

Julian is part of a wealthy and ancient family, and one day, his legacy will include his mother’s vast library of spell books—and the knowledge he needs to correct his past mistakes. But his inheritance comes with a stipulation: he has to be married before he can collect. What he needs is a husband….

West and Julian can help each other, and at first they don’t want anything further. But as they dodge meddling cousins, jealous rivals, and an insidious drug, it becomes clear that their lives are entwined in ways they never imagined—and they’re in greater danger than they thought possible.

Parker Foye developed a sizable agenda for themselves with Mage of Inconvenience.  Foye had to develop a large enough universe to contain both witches and werewolf societies  (I’m talking extended families, cultures, laws, set across a sprawling geographical map), then start to tunnel it down to encapsulate the two men at the heart of Mage of Inconvenience, West and Julian.  We get alternating povs that let’s us see the desperate situation that each man or being find’s himself in that leads up to their marriage of convenience. A great job in all cases with the world building.

Of particular note is the creation of the drug Rabid that’s spreading through the shifter population with devastating effect.  You see this drug through West’s eyes as he observes addicted shifters and through bits and pieces of his memories. It pulls on your emotions as you will make direct ties to today’s drug problems.  Julian’s needs seem completely separate and different…at first.  He wants to inherit his mother’s estate and keep it out of the hands of greedy relatives.  To do that he needs to marry and soon.  West fits the bill nicely.  Of course there is much more to it than that.

The characterizations are nicely layered, the plot has a great many twists and turns that will keep you suitably shocked and surprised, and, it’s still suspenseful  enough to keep you on the edge of your seat right up until the edge of the seat. While it did get a little soft around the middle, I still thought the writing was smooth and flowed all the way to the end.

I liked the slow build to trust and romance here and in some cases, it has the feel of a much larger story.

Love the supernatural?  And romance?  How about both together?  Dreamspinner Press’ Dreamspun Beyond is doing a fantastic job of combining both and Mage of Inconvenience by Parker Foye is a perfect example why.  Pick it up and try it out today.

Cover art:  Aaron Anderson.  Love the cover. Great Job.

Sales Links:  Dreamspinner Press | Amazon

Book Details:

ebook, 212 pages
Expected publication: March 20th 2018 by Dreamspinner Press
ISBN139781640802469
Edition LanguageEnglish
URL

Trying Times and Scattered Thoughts. This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

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Trying Times and Scattered Thoughts

This week I’m still trying to wrap my head around several thoughts this week, none of which is actually coming together into an cohesive post.   That’s the impact of all the events of the last week is having on me I guess.

Without even knowing the people involved, I’m hurting for them.  And our LGBTQIA  community.  I don’t know why I would think that the harm to the  community would always come from outside. Several times that’s proven not to be the case.  Santino Hassell is not the first case of catfishing, but  he has also hurt others in far worse ways.  That story is still unraveling.

Then there is the deeply disturbing events that lead to Riptide Publishing cutting all ties to  Sarah Lyon, ex Editoral Director, and Kate DeGroot, ex freelance editor and regrouping.  So many elements there to occupy my mind, but floating to the top have been things like “POC can’t be on book covers because they won’t sell. ”  And the obvious racism that existed at every corner there for some personnel/authors.  In an age of diversity, when we are talking about Quiltbag fiction…how can we still be facing such blatant racism?

Any why was it allowed to continue?

I get the power imbalance.  How could any of those authors speak up?  It would  cost them their stories and perhaps their livelihood. Or the artists who design covers they authors get to choose from.  I bet they got the message loud and clear to begin with. But truly?  Now, here?  Isn’t it time for us to be done with this?

But then I started to look through all the stories, catalogs, tons of covers…and noticed a dearth of yes, POC.  I began to wonder….are there more people like Sarah out there  telling artists and authors in our community …”don’t put POC on the cover, it won’t sell…”.  What an insidious, mean, racist sentence.  Guaranteed to make someone without power stop and think, and perhaps pull back.

I think it’s becoming clear..yes racism is with us…even in the LGBTQIA community.  We just need to choose to recognize it.  And then deal with it in a positive manner.  Help support those authors and publishers going forward towards  diversity across the spectrum in every way.

What are your thoughts on this and this whole sorry week.  Mine clearly are still coming together….

This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Sunday, March 18:

  • This Week at Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words

Monday, March 19:

  • DSP Promo Sarah Black on American Road Trip
  • BLITZ Tomboy by Janelle Reston
  • Livingston (Trenton Security #1) by J.M. Dabney Release Day Blog
  • A MelanieM Review:Livingston (Trenton Security #1) by J.M. Dabney
  • A Stella Review One Under by JL Merrow
  • An Alisa Review: No Rulebook for Flirting by Laura Bailo

Tuesday, March 20:

  • Blog Tour Jace’s Trial by JM Wolf
  • BLITZ The Moth and Moon by Glenn Quigley
  • TOUR Cutie Pies by Barbara Bell
  • A MelanieM Review:  Mage of Inconvenience by Parker Foye
  • An Alisa Review: Captive Hearts (Deviant Hearts #1) by A E Ryecart
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Audiobook Review: A Wild Ride (The Bullriders #1) by Andrew Grey and John Solo (Narrator)

Wednesday, March 21:

  • DSP Promo Julia Talbot
  • BLITZ The Vampire’s Angel by Damian Serbu
  • Release Blitz – Breaking the Rules by C.J. Lynne
  • A Caryn Review The Weekend Bucket List by Mia Kerick
  • An Alisa Review: The Paramedic Who Hated Jazz by Stephani Hecht
  • A Stella Review: Jace’s Trial (Trials in Abingdon #1) by J.M. Wolf (

Thursday, March 22:

  • DSP Promo S.E. Harmon
  • TOUR The Vampire’s Angel by Damian Serbu
  • RELEASE DAY BLITZ Moon Illusion by Michelle Osgood
  • An Ali Review: ​​​​Oskar Blows a Gasket​ by Al Stewart​
  • A MelanieM Review: Partner with Benefits (Kolar Creek Tales) by Val Francis
  • A Barb the Zany Old Lady Audiobook Review: How to Bang a Billionaire (Arden St. Ives #1) by Alexis Hall and Joel Leslie (Narrator)

Friday, March 23:

  • DSP PROMO SJD Peterson on Going Of Grid
  • Release Day Blitz for Leaning into the Look by Lane Hayes
  • Tour and Giveaway: One Under by JL Merrow
  • A Lila Release Day Review:   Going Off Grid by SJD Peterson
  • A MelanieM Review: One Under by JL Merrow
  • An Alisa Audiobook Review: Permanent Ink (Art & Soul #1) by Avon Gale and Piper Vaughn /Kirt Graves (Narrator)

Saturday, March 24:

  • A MelanieM Review: Murder Takes the High Road by Josh Lanyon

A MelanieM Review: Sound of Silence by Mia Kerick and Raine O’Tierney

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Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5

 

High school senior Renzy Callen hasn’t uttered a word in years. He likes being invisible to all around him; it keeps life safe and predictable. In his attic bedroom, he experiences a world far from the drama of his family. He doodles, listens to music, and contemplates the troubled souls he observes when attending self-help meetings designed for people with problems he doesn’t have. Renzy lives his life like a spectator, always on the outside of life’s games, looking in at others.

Everything changes when Seven and Morning Moreau-Maddox relocate from their glitzy lives in Paris to boring, picturesque Redcliff Hills, Missouri. Tall, platinum blond, and as put-together as a pair of European high-fashion models, the sophisticated siblings befriend Renzy, drawing him in and then pushing him away. What starts as nothing more than a means to an end for Seven, however, quickly becomes something more. Could icy-hearted Seven be thawing for the silent, quirky charm of Renzy Callen?

Determined to find the cause of Renzy’s selective mutism, the three teens set off on a road trip, during which they discover that flawless physical facades can conceal the most scarred souls, and that sometimes silence is better than golden.

It’s not often a contemporary story can astonish me with elements of uniqueness but Sound of Silence by Mia Kerick and Raine O’Tierney certainly did.  Several times over.  Starting with the protagonists themselves,  the three wounded teenagers at the heart of this story, Renzy Callen, Seven and Morning Moreau-Maddox.

I can’t imagine where or how the authors came up with these characters, now marked so indelibly into my heart and mind, but starting with Renzy Callen, who hasn’t talked in years, his inability to utter a sound and his method of communicating is the soul of the story.   He tries to blend into his surroundings, ghosting through his life, invisible until he  comes to the notice of Morning Moreau-Maddox, ateenager traumatized from a brutal rape,  and through association to Morning, her brother Maddox, her constant companion and protector.  Sleek, blond, seemingly self possessed, Morning recognizes a kinself with herself in Renzy, both dealing with their own traumas in different ways but still alike.  For Maddox, Renzy presents a puzzle to unravel as well as one more person to act as guardian over.

This book operates on so many levels and it’s done so well, it’s actually hard to reviews.  The characterizations are highly unusual, layered, remarkable.  You have three separate voices that are guaranteed to stay in your head for quite some time.  Especially as they grow over the course of the story, events forcing them to look at themselves, reexamine the dynamics of their own relationships from those of the siblings to that of the young lovers Renzy and Maddox.  It is one complex relationship after another.  Plus the close friendship  that Morning has with Renzy.  And that’s not even starting to get into the odd parent or should I say emotionally detached or worse parent relationships these teenagers have.

Like twisting vines of ivy, the various story threads, wind their way through each other connecting and intertwining in surprising and sometimes heartbreaking ways to uncover the truth behind Renzy’s selective mutism.  It will also lead to new paths for Morning and Maddox as well.

Such an amazing novel.  The writing is smooth and so well done that you don’t notice how quickly you’ve been drawn into the lives of this incredible trio until you realize it’s 2am and you haven’t stopped reading.  I loved the ending.  Like everything else about this story,  the changes and growth of the characters to the last sentence, everything works and makes you want to read it again just to to watch it unfold all over again.

I highly recommend Sound of Silence by Mia Kerick and Raine O’Tierney.  It’s truly one of those books you won’t want to miss.

Cover Artist: Aaron Anderson.  Cover art is just as unusual as the book.

Buy Links: Amazon US | Amazon UK | Harmony Ink | iBooks

Book Details:

Kindle Edition, 214 pages
Published January 23rd 2018 by Harmony Ink Press
ASIN B076QB8CXH
Edition Language English

Russell J. Sanders on the Titanic, Tex-Mex, and his new release ‘Titanic Summer’ (guest blog)

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Titanic Summer by Russell J. Sanders
Harmony Ink Press
Cover Artist: Aaron Anderson

Buy Links: Harmony Ink Press |  Amazon

Scattered Thoughts and Rogue Words is happy to have Russell J. Sanders here  today talking about his latest story Titanic Summers. Welcome, Russell.

♦︎

Titanic Summer: A Li’l Travel, a Li’l Politics, and a Lotta Enchiladas

By Russell Sanders

The best hobbies are those that give you joy, engage your mind, and lead you on a quest. You lose yourself in the research, the acquiring, the sheer happiness of just sitting and staring at your treasures. Oh, how I’ve experienced all that! I can spend hours at the piano, playing and singing for only me. I can peruse cookbooks, looking at variations of a single recipe just to decide how I, the amateur chef, will compose a delicacy. I can lose myself in the vast internet, planning an exotic trip—booking those flights to Bali, choosing the seats for that Broadway show, reading all about the museum in Boston so I’ll savor every moment, drooling over the thought of the Mexican food I’ve found in Bar Harbor of all places. And I can never flip the TV remote past a documentary on the Titanic, that magnificent ship that sank on its maiden voyage.

The story of the Titanic has everything: mystery, majesty, the rich and famous, the downtrodden seeking new lives in a new land, the hubris of designers and ship line magnates declaring the ship unsinkable, and it has Molly Brown, the unsinkable wannabe society dame from Colorado, filthy rich and not afraid to spend it! The tale of the Titanic has everything, and I can’t get enough. Books, movies, TV, exhibits…I’ve read ‘em all, seen ‘em all, visited ‘em all.

So fresh off a pilgrimage to the Titanic graves and the Titanic museum in Halifax, Nova Scotia, ten years ago, I began another journey. I wanted my next novel to feature that Titanic experience in some way.

I write novels intended primarily for teen readers. My ego and my desire want them to be far much more, great works that everyone wants and needs and has to read. So pick up a copy of Titanic Summer. You won’t be disappointed even if you’re sixty-five and still a teen at heart. But I digress. I knew that most teens would not be all that excited about the ship that hit the iceberg. But what if a teen’s dad was? And what if Dad took his son on his pilgrimage? And what if teen got into the whole Titanic thing because he loved his dad?

Ah! Now that’s what stories are made of. With little more than that, I began writing. And writing. And writing. Ten years later, ten zillion revisions later, Titanic Summer became what it is today. The book that Harmony Ink Press decided to take a chance on. Oh—I forgot. Add another revision to it all because even after Harmony Ink accepted the manuscript (and yes, that was only after I did a further revision for them,) the editing process began and that first edit was like re-writing the whole novel. I have never worked so hard on an edit in my life. But it was worth it. Titanic Summer is now as magnificent as the ship it rode in on. Yeah, I know—that’s for the readers to decide. If an author can’t use a little hyperbole, who can?

Somewhere in all those revisions, teen Jake became gay, and in real life, Houston city council passed an equal rights ordinance. That bit of history was ultimately defeated by the voters, and I, a devastated Houston gay man, realized that any poor teenage Houstonian gay would be profoundly affected by it all. And another layer was added to Jake’s story.

Titanic Summer is a travelogue. Readers—I’m talkin’ to you out there because you just gotta read this book!—will journey from Houston to Philadelphia to Boston to Portland, Maine, to Halifax, and back to Philly and Houston. There are lots of sights to be seen.

Titanic Summer is also another kind of journey. A sixteen-year-old boy who knows he’s gay and doesn’t want to accept it. He doesn’t care if anyone else in the world is gay, but he doesn’t want to have anything to do with it for himself. Not because he doesn’t want to be gay; he just doesn’t want anyone to know about him. It’s a roller coaster ride for Jake, folks. Step right up and see the kid try to take the next rise and sudden dip—whoosh! Will he live to ride again, or will he end up tossing his cookies, vowing never to get on that Texas Hurricane again?

Titanic Summer is Tex-Mex. Oh, it is Tex-Mex. Believe me, if you don’t finish this wanting some nachos, some enchiladas, some chips, some salsa, some guac, then you seriously are not a Houstonian. But we can make you one real fast. Dive in, the water’s fine (make that a Margarita; that is, if you’re legal—we don’t advocate underage drinking, y’all.) Search Yelp and find the nearest Tex Mex near you, jump on your pony, and head out to the feeding trough. And better yet, if there’s a Chuy’s near you, that’s the place to go. If you’re a novice, start with the Panchos. Then graduate to the Classic Tex Mex enchiladas. After that, you’re good to go. Do like me. Find you some Mexican food wherever you travel. It might turn out to be great (Jakarta, Indonesia) or might turn out to be rather strange (Rome, Italy) but it’s always an adventure. And if you’re not craving chips and salsa after reading Titanic Summer, I’ve not done my job. By the way, I am NOT a paid spokesperson for Chuy’s Restaurants. But if I got a little rebate from each time I’ve eaten there, I’d be a wealthy man.

So there you have it—the lowdown on Titanic Summer. Part Canada, part New England, part Houston, and all heart. And Tex-Mex. Don’t forget the Tex-Mex.

Blurb—Titanic Summer

It’s 2015, and teenage Jake Hardy is hiding something. During a summer trip to the Titanic Mecca of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jake’s father makes a confession, and though Jake feels upset and confused, he also wants to be understanding. But he feels deceived—much like he’s deceiving those he cares about. Jake is gay, just not ready to tell the world.

Jake and his father are far from alone in their secrets, as Jake discovers back in Texas, where the fight for and against the Equal Rights Ordinance rages. He’s surprised to learn how much the outcome will affect his friends, and he’s torn between standing with them and the wishes of his religious fanatic mother. Being true to himself won’t be easy or painless, and it will come with sacrifices—and rewards.

About the Author

Russell J. Sanders is a lifelong devotee of the theater. He’s a singer, actor, and director, winning awards for his acting roles and shows he has directed. As a teacher, he has taught theater arts to hundreds of students, plus he’s also taught literature and writing to thousands of others. Russell has also traveled the world, visiting Indonesia, Japan, India, Canada, the Caribbean, London, Amsterdam, Paris, Rome, Florence, and Venice—and almost all the US states. His friends think he’s crazy, but wherever he goes, he seeks out Mexican restaurants. The Mexican food in Tokyo was great, he says; in Rome, not so good. Texans cut their teeth on barbecue and Mexican food. Russell’s love for enchiladas led him on a quest to try them wherever he can find them, and he has found them in some very out-of-the-way places. And good or bad, he’s delighted to sample his favorite food. Most importantly, Russell is an out-and-proud gay man, living in Houston with his husband, a relatively recent marriage but a relationship that started twenty years ago. He hopes that his novels inspire confidence and instill pride in his young gay fans, and he also hopes others learn from his work, as well.

Website: www.russelljsanders.weebly.com   

Facebook: www.facebook.com/russell.sanders.14

Visit my website: www.russelljsanders.weebly.com

Follow me on Facebook at Russell J. Sanders, author: https://www.facebook.com/Russell-J-Sanders-author-514666448554674/

Follow me on Twitter: @russelljsanders

Visit my author page on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Russell-Sanders/e/B00AVXOY80/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

View my about me page:  https://about.me/russell.sanders

View my book trailers:  (all book trailers use free use public domain images and music)

Thirteen Therapists: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fH-zdafR2c8&feature=youtu.be

Special Effect: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrVphGxgXqc&feature=youtu.be

The Book of Ethan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6IBm1CBINg

Colors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwkLr2TTpcI

All You Need Is Love: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsQUwQUoUzs&feature=youtu.be

Titanic Summer: https://youtu.be/tVqWvlOP-PQ